nukem nukem@datamost.com

springfield

all about me apparently

  • Astronomy Picture of the Day for 2020-05-26 12:30:02.274350

    Astronomy Picture of the Day (Unofficial) at 2020-05-26T17:30:03Z

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer.

    2020 May 26
    See Explanation.  Clicking on the picture will download
the highest resolution version available.

    The Milky Way over Snow-Capped Himalayas
    Image Credit & Copyright: Tomas Havel

    Explanation: What’s higher than the Himalayas? Although the Himalayan Mountains are the tallest on planet Earth, they don't measure up to the Milky Way. Visible above the snow-capped mountains in the featured image is the arcing central band of our home galaxy. The bright spot just above the central plane is the planet Jupiter, while the brightest orange spot on the upper right is the star Antares. The astrophotographer braved below-zero temperatures at nearly 4,000-meters altitude to take the photographs that compose this image. The featured picture is a composite of eight exposures taken with same camera and from the same location over three hours, just after sunset, in 2019 April, from near Bimtang Lake in Nepal. Over much of planet Earth, the planets Mercury (faint) and Venus (bright) will be visible this week after sunset.

    Experts Debate: How will humanity first discover extraterrestrial life?
    Tomorrow's picture: Earth from Saturn

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  • Astronomy Picture of the Day for 2020-05-25 12:30:02.183949

    Astronomy Picture of the Day (Unofficial) at 2020-05-25T17:30:02Z

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer.

    2020 May 25
    See Explanation.  Clicking on the picture will download
the highest resolution version available.

    Mystic Mountain Monster being Destroyed
    Image Credit: Hubble, NASA, ESA; Processing & License: Judy Schmidt

    Explanation: Inside the head of this interstellar monster is a star that is slowly destroying it. The huge monster, actually an inanimate series of pillars of gas and dust, measures light years in length. The in-head star is not itself visible through the opaque interstellar dust but is bursting out partly by ejecting opposing beams of energetic particles called Herbig-Haro jets. Located about 7,500 light years away in the Carina Nebula and known informally as Mystic Mountain, the appearance of these pillars is dominated by dark dust even though they are composed mostly of clear hydrogen gas. The featured image was taken with the Hubble Space Telescope. All over these pillars, the energetic light and winds from massive newly formed stars are evaporating and dispersing the dusty stellar nurseries in which they formed. Within a few million years, the head of this giant, as well as most of its body, will have been completely evaporated by internal and surrounding stars.

    APOD across world languages: Arabic, Catalan, Chinese (Beijing), Chinese (Taiwan), Croatian, Czech, Dutch, Farsi, French,
    French, German, Hebrew, Indonesian, Japanese, Korean, Montenegrin, Polish, Russian, Serbian, Slovenian, Spanish and Ukrainian
    Tomorrow's picture: Higher than the Himalayas

    José Antonio Seguido Doblado, nukem likes this.

    Whoa, epic! 😅

    JanKusanagi at 2020-05-25T18:22:26Z

  • Shakthi Kannan at 2020-05-26T13:46:01Z

    "A reader lives a thousand lives before he dies. The man who never reads lives only one." ~ George R. R. Martin

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  • Note - #AndStatus v.56.09 (326) released. "Show numbers of likes, replies and reblogs…

    at 2020-05-24T08:14:01Z

    #AndStatus v.56.09 (326) released. "Show numbers of likes, replies and reblogs for a Note
    1. Show numbers of likes, replies and reblogs for Mastodon; likes and retweets for Twitter. Added similar to #ActivityPub #C2S, hope the same counters will be supported there also.
    2. Added Actors's name ("Real name") as a separate field to Actor's profile. Created landscape layout for Actor's profile.
    https://github.com/andstatus/andstatus/issues/456

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  • at 2020-05-25T10:47:18Z

    週六傍晚 Saturday Evening

    http://media.academia.tw/u/trc/m/taipei-7385/

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  • Astronomy Picture of the Day for 2020-05-24 12:30:01.740998

    Astronomy Picture of the Day (Unofficial) at 2020-05-24T17:30:02Z

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer.

    2020 May 24
    See Explanation.  Clicking on the picture will download
the highest resolution version available.

    Valles Marineris: The Grand Canyon of Mars
    Image Credit: NASA, USGS, Viking Project

    Explanation: The largest canyon in the Solar System cuts a wide swath across the face of Mars. Named Valles Marineris, the grand valley extends over 3,000 kilometers long, spans as much as 600 kilometers across, and delves as much as 8 kilometers deep. By comparison, the Earth's Grand Canyon in Arizona, USA is 800 kilometers long, 30 kilometers across, and 1.8 kilometers deep. The origin of the Valles Marineris remains unknown, although a leading hypothesis holds that it started as a crack billions of years ago as the planet cooled. Several geologic processes have been identified in the canyon. The featured mosaic was created from over 100 images of Mars taken by Viking Orbiters in the 1970s.

    Tomorrow's picture: interstellar monster

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  • Foxtrot

    at 2020-03-10T01:31:43Z

    I was handed down another orchid!

    It shall be named: Foxtrot

    Its leaves are in pretty bad shape but let's see if it can recover.

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  • Contrary to False Posts, Sanitizer Helpful Against Coronavirus

    Assessment of U.S. Politics at 2020-03-10T17:14:24Z

    "Contrary to False Posts, Sanitizer Helpful Against Coronavirus"

    Screenshots circulating on Facebook falsely claim that hand sanitizer will "do nothing for the coronavirus." The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says hand sanitizers with 60% alcohol can be used to help prevent contracting and spreading the virus.

    The post Contrary to False Posts, Sanitizer Helpful Against Coronavirus appeared first on FactCheck.org.

    https://www.factcheck.org/2020/03/contrary-to-false-posts-sanitizer-helpful-against-coronavirus/

    ( Feed URL: http://www.factcheck.org/feed/ )

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  • at 2020-03-11T15:30:02Z

    No comment.

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  • Shakthi Kannan at 2020-03-12T16:51:01Z

    To find which package provides a file on Parabola GNU/Linux-libre use pkgfile. For example: $ pkgfile which

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  • Renato Candido at 2020-03-10T11:40:49Z

    DuckDuckGo Tracker Radar Exposes Hidden Tracking https://spreadprivacy.com/duckduckgo-tracker-radar/

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    McClane, nukem, EVAnaRkISTO, EVAnaRkISTO@DM and 1 others shared this.

    Although Mozilla says it's a Non Trusted Extension, I have installed anyway to test it.

    EVAnaRkISTO@DM at 2020-03-11T11:37:35Z

  • Coronavirus Fears Haven’t Sunk Sales of Corona Beer in U.S.

    Assessment of U.S. Politics at 2020-03-10T18:14:39Z

    "Coronavirus Fears Haven’t Sunk Sales of Corona Beer in U.S."

    Corona’s parent company reports that its beer sales in the U.S. are up this year, contrary to viral Facebook posts that falsely claim its U.S. sales have dropped because of the new coronavirus.

    The post Coronavirus Fears Haven’t Sunk Sales of Corona Beer in U.S. appeared first on FactCheck.org.

    https://www.factcheck.org/2020/03/coronavirus-fears-havent-sunk-sales-of-corona-beer-in-u-s/

    ( Feed URL: http://www.factcheck.org/feed/ )

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  • Renato Candido at 2020-03-05T18:21:55Z

    The Story of Physics Animated in 4 Minutes: From Galileo and Newton, to Einstein http://www.openculture.com/2020/02/the-story-of-physics-animated-in-4-minutes.html

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  • Astronomy Picture of the Day for 2020-03-02 12:30:01.638317

    Astronomy Picture of the Day (Unofficial) at 2020-03-02T18:30:02Z

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer.

    2020 March 2
    See Explanation.  Clicking on the picture will download
the highest resolution version available.

    Sharpless-308: The Dolphin Nebula
    Image Credit & Copyright: Chilesope 2, Pleaides Astrophotography Team (Peking U.)

    Explanation: Blown by fast winds from a hot, massive star, this cosmic bubble is much larger than the dolphin it appears to be. Cataloged as Sharpless 2-308 it lies some 5,200 light-years away toward the constellation of the Big Dog (Canis Major) and covers slightly more of the sky than a Full Moon. That corresponds to a diameter of 60 light-years at its estimated distance. The massive star that created the bubble, a Wolf-Rayet star, is the bright one near the center of the nebula. Wolf-Rayet stars have over 20 times the mass of the Sun and are thought to be in a brief, pre-supernova phase of massive star evolution. Fast winds from this Wolf-Rayet star create the bubble-shaped nebula as they sweep up slower moving material from an earlier phase of evolution. The windblown nebula has an age of about 70,000 years. Relatively faint emission captured in the featured expansive image is dominated by the glow of ionized oxygen atoms mapped to a blue hue.

    Tomorrow's picture: around the moon

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  • John Oliver QOTD

    JanKusanagi at 2020-02-26T01:22:50Z

    “There is one, and only one thing that it's OK to admire Hitler for, and it's the fact that he killed Hitler”


    🤣 😂 😆

    🤣 🤣 🤣 🤣 🤣 🤣 🤣 🤣 🤣 🤣 🤣 🤣 🤣

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  • ‘Flash photography’ at the LHC

    ParticleNews at 2020-02-27T17:27:58Z

    "‘Flash photography’ at the LHC"

    An extremely fast new detector inside the CMS detector will allow physicists to get a sharper image of particle collisions.

    Timing detector

    Some of the best commercially available high-speed cameras can capture thousands of frames every second. They produce startling videos of water balloons popping and hummingbirds flying in ultra-slow motion. 

    But what if you want to capture an image of a process so fast that it looks blurry if the shutter is open for even a billionth of a second? This is the type of challenge scientists on experiments like CMS and ATLAS face as they study particle collisions at CERN’s Large Hadron Collider. 

    When the LHC is operating to its full potential, bunches of about 100 billion protons cross each other’s paths every 25 nanoseconds. During each crossing, which lasts about 2 nanoseconds, about 50 protons collide and produce new particles. Figuring out which particle came from which collision can be a daunting task.

    “Usually in ATLAS and CMS, we measure the charge, energy and momentum of a particle, and also try to infer where it was produced,” says Karri DiPetrillo, a postdoctoral fellow working on the CMS experiment at the US Department of Energy’s Fermilab. “We’ve had timing measurements before—on the order of nanoseconds, which is sufficient to assign particles to the correct bunch crossing, but not enough to resolve the individual collisions within the same bunch.”

    Thanks to a new type of detector DiPetrillo and her collaborators are building for the CMS experiment, this is about to change. 

    “These time stamps will enable
    us to determine when in time different collisions occurred.”

    Physicists on the CMS experiment are devising a new detector capable of creating a more accurate timestamp for passing particles. The detector will separate the 2-nanosecond bursts of particles into several consecutive snapshots—a feat a bit like taking 30 billion pictures a second. 

    This will help physicists with a mounting challenge at the LHC: collision pileup.

    Picking apart which particle tracks came from which collision is a challenge. A planned upgrade to the intensity of the LHC will increase the number of collisions per bunch crossing by a factor of four—that is from 50 to 200 proton collisions—making that challenge even greater.  

    Currently, physicists look at where the collisions occurred along the beamline as a way to identify which particular tracks came from which collision. The new timing detector will add another dimension to that. 

    “These time stamps will enable us to determine when in time different collisions occurred, effectively separating individual bunch crossings into multiple ‘frames,’” says DiPetrillo.

    DiPetrillo and fellow US scientists working on the project are supported by DOE’s Office of Science, which is also contributing support for the detector development.

    According to DiPetrillo, being able to separate the collisions based on when they occur will have huge downstream impacts on every aspect of the research. “Disentangling different collisions cleans up our understanding of an event so well that we’ll effectively gain three more years of data at the High-Luminosity LHC. This increase in statistics will give us more precise measurements, and more chances to find new particles we’ve never seen before,” she says. 

    The precise time stamps will also help physicists search for heavy, slow moving particles they might have missed in the past.

    “Most particles produced at the LHC travel at close to the speed of light,” DiPetrillo says. “But a very heavy particle would travel slower. If we see a particle arriving much later than expected, our timing detector could flag that for us.”

    The new timing detector inside CMS will consist of a 5-meter-long cylindrical barrel made from 160,000 individual scintillating crystals, each approximately the width and length of a matchstick. This crystal barrel will be capped on its open ends with disks containing delicately layered radiation-hard silicon sensors. The barrel, about 2 meters in diameter, will surround the inner detectors that compose CMS’s tracking system closest to the collision point. DiPetrillo and her colleagues are currently working out how the various sensors and electronics at each end of the barrel will coordinate to give a time stamp within 30 to 50 picoseconds.

    “Normally when a particle passes through a detector, the energy it deposits is converted into an electrical pulse that rises steeply and the falls slowly over the course of a few nanoseconds,” says Joel Butler, the Fermilab scientist coordinating this project. “To register one of these passing particles in under 50 picoseconds, we need a signal that reaches its peaks even faster.”

    Scientists can use the steep rising slopes of these signals to separate the collisions not only in space, but also in time. In the barrel of the detector, a particle passing through the crystals will release a burst of light that will be recorded by specialized electronics. Based on when the intense flash of light arrives at each sensor, physicists will be able to calculate the particle’s exact location and when it passed. Particles will also produce a quick pulse in the endcaps, which are made from a new type of silicon sensor that amplifies the signal. Each silicon sensor is about the size of a domino and can determine the location of a passing particle to within 1.3 millimeters.

    The physicists working on the timing detector plan to have all the components ready and installed inside CMS for the start-up of the High Luminosity LHC in 2027

    “High-precision timing is a new concept in high-energy physics,” says DiPetrillo. “I think it will be the direction we pursue for future detectors and colliders because of its huge physics potential. For me, it’s an incredibly exciting and novel project to be on right now.”

    https://www.symmetrymagazine.org/article/flash-photography-at-the-lhc?utm_source=main_feed_click&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=main_feed&utm_content=click

    ( Feed URL: http://www.symmetrymagazine.org/feed )

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  • Bits from the Debian Community Team (Jan 2020)

    Debian Project at 2020-01-15T14:12:09Z

    Bits from the Debian Community Team (Jan 2020) https://lists.debian.org/debian-devel-announce/2020/01/msg00000.html

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  • Shakthi Kannan at 2020-01-15T16:02:01Z

    The January 2020 edition of OSFY magazine has my article on rx.el in #Emacs #Lisp http://lfymag.com/currentissue.asp?id=13 @OpenSourceForU

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  • Astronomy Picture of the Day for 2020-01-15 12:30:01.665537

    Astronomy Picture of the Day (Unofficial) at 2020-01-15T18:30:02Z

    Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer.

    2020 January 15
    See Explanation.  Clicking on the picture will download
the highest resolution version available.

    Iridescent Clouds over Sweden
    Image Credit & Copyright: Goran Strand

    Explanation: Why would these clouds multi-colored? A relatively rare phenomenon in clouds known as iridescence can bring up unusual colors vividly or even a whole spectrum of colors simultaneously. These polar stratospheric clouds clouds, also known as nacreous and mother-of-pearl clouds, are formed of small water droplets of nearly uniform size. When the Sun is in the right position and, typically, hidden from direct view, these thin clouds can be seen significantly diffracting sunlight in a nearly coherent manner, with different colors being deflected by different amounts. Therefore, different colors will come to the observer from slightly different directions. Many clouds start with uniform regions that could show iridescence but quickly become too thick, too mixed, or too angularly far from the Sun to exhibit striking colors. The featured image and an accompanying video were taken late last year over Ostersund, Sweden.

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    Tomorrow's picture: a stellar galaxy

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  • The Senate impeachment trial is here. So what’s next?

    Assessment of U.S. Politics at 2020-01-15T23:14:53Z

    "The Senate impeachment trial is here. So what’s next?"

    After a weeks-long delay, the process of impeaching and removing President Donald Trump is moving forward again. On Jan. 15, the House voted to formally send to the Senate the impeachment articles that had passed the House in mid-December. What happens next depends heavily on precedent from prior impeachment trials, though some wild cards could be in store. Here’s a rundown of what to expect as the Senate trial gets under way. What’s next? Impeachment is a "privileged" resolution, which means that the Senate must take it up in place of other pending business.  Two-thirds of senators, 67 if all ... >>More

    http://www.politifact.com/truth-o-meter/article/2020/jan/15/senate-impeachment-trial-whats-next/

    ( Feed URL: http://www.politifact.com/feeds/articles/truth-o-meter/ )

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